Student FAQ

The scientific method is the universally accepted, organized approach to the study of science. It consists of the following:

  • a reasonable hypothesis, based on completed background reading

  • relevant research (often including experiments) so you can evaluate your hypothesis

  • observations and data

  • summary of results

  • conclusions relating directly to your hypothesis

  • a discussion and explanation of the results (unexpected or expected), including ideas on how the project might be expanded and how results might be applied in the future

ELEMENTARY STUDENTS

You may choose to do an experimental or a non-experimental/research project.

  • Experimental projects: These projects  involve testing a hypothesis under controlled conditions using the scientific method. As the researcher, you control several variables, manipulate one variable in a controlled way, and then measure, record and analyze the responding variable to reach a conclusion.
  • Non-experimental/research projects: These projects include surveys, model construction, computer programming, engineering design, and literature surveys.

SECONDARY STUDENTS

You may choose to do an experimental project, an innovation, or a study.

  • Experimental projects: These projects involve testing a hypothesis under controlled conditions using the scientific method. As the researcher, you control several variables, manipulate one variable in a controlled way, and then measure, record and analyze the responding variable, to reach your conclusion.

  • Innovation projects: These projects focus on the development and evaluation of innovative devices, models or techniques in technology, engineering or computers (hardware or software). As the researcher, you should demonstrate an understanding of the properties of the materials/methods used, the reasons for choosing them, and the effectiveness of your design. Test your innovation and modify it if you discover shortcomings during testing.

  • Study Projects: These projects involve the collection and analysis of data to reveal evidence of a fact or a situation of scientific interest. They could include a study of cause and effect relationships or theoretical investigations of scientific data.

To learn about the elements of an experimental project: Experimental Projects

To learn about the elements of a non-experimental/research project: Research Projects

Every student doing a science fair project MUST HAVE A LOGBOOK.

  1. To learn about logbooks: Logbooks

  1. To view a copy of the Elementary Judging Tally Sheet: Judging Elementary Tally Sheet

  2. To view a copy of the Secondary Judging Tally Sheet: Judging Secondary Tally Sheet

To  view an excellent video/dvd produced by the Canada Wide Science Fair and Encana during the Canada Wide Science Fair at Truro, NS, click here.